covid anger

There has been no shortage of tension during COVID-19. When you have financial responsibilities, children or are trying your best to share space with others if you have to work from home, life is purely overwhelming. You have lost balance and peace, and because of it, feelings of anger can ensue.

Understandably, this time is a challenge for people worldwide, and by evaluating your life, your circumstances and how you feel, you can begin to discover how to manage these emotions. How you have acted up until now may not have been ideal; however, how you respond moving forward is what matters. Learn more about what may be triggering your anger and how to curb it in the midst of this pandemic.

Don’t Let Disappointment Turn into Anger During COVID-19

When the pandemic started, perhaps you had just been promoted or were given an opportunity to work on a big project that could lead you to other career opportunities. Maybe your child was supposed to reach a milestone like graduating, but the pandemic prevented this. Disappointingly, you may have had to compromise your pay raise, apply for unemployment or put a big project on hold. Likewise, you had to support your child through their unique situation. Your first impulse might be to blame the pandemic, which is completely normal. But before your disappointment turns into anger, take time to pause and sit with your feelings.

  • Dive deeper than the obvious; create a list of everything in your life that has been affected.
  • Let yourself feel the range of emotion that comes with these disappointments.
  • Look at your place in all of this. Can you still work from home? Are your loved ones healthy? Are you healthy?
  • Next, use this as an opportunity to see what you can accomplish amid this time—what you want to rebuild.
  • If you’re still struggling, consider an anger management program.

Practice Healthy Communication Strategies

Sometimes when you have fits of anger, your family is around to witness it. Worse, sometimes, they are the ones in the line of fire and being unfairly treated no matter how right you might feel at the time. Arguments can arise over conversations surrounding the pandemic: political, hygienic, or ideas over what the coronavirus is and can do. Such varying opinions could create tension and resentment toward your loved one—especially if you’re together 24/7. When you reach such combativeness with a loved one, it is time to exercise open communication. Bottling up emotions while living in close quarters without space for reprieve could cause families to collapse.

  • Express how you feel about what is irritating you, however difficult it may be, to diffuse tensions from escalating.
  • Express to your loved ones what the hot button issues are, and to avoid bringing them up in conversation.
  • Additionally, if this is a matter of security—say with a friend who keeps dropping by, despite social distancing requirements—you will want to set boundaries for them. Let them know what makes you feel comfortable and uncomfortable.

Find Coping Mechanisms for Anger During COVID-19

You should never feel ashamed for feeling a certain way about something. However, when one emotion takes over, such as anger, and it begins to interfere with your life, you will want to find the right coping mechanisms or treatment to help channel anger into something healthier. Implementing practices such as mindfulness, meditation, and exploring other outlets like music, writing or painting are great ways to combat such negative feelings. Remember, just because the emotions are negative does not mean you are.

Remember, this time is unique—not just to you, but everybody around the world. We are all dealing with this in different ways and therefore navigating it in different ways. Try not to become angry or disappointed when something or someone does not meet your expectations. Instead, focus on the health of your family and yourself. Continue to find ways to be social, exercise and stay in touch with your emotions. These practices should bring balance to your life and help offset anger during COVID-19. 

If you have lost sight of your character and have allowed anger to flood your life, it is time to seek professional help. At Associated Behavioral Health Care, we provide services for anger management. We also acknowledge these unique times and have telehealth services in place to make sure care is available. To learn more, call us today at (844) 335-7384.

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